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Why is the US ranked 17th in the World, educationally?

How did the United States get so sideways with its educational system?

I’m not sure exactly what caused the U.S. to lose ground educationally, but there are a number of common denominators among the top ranking countries that relate to their success. Although they have very different cultures and governments, the top ten BEST ranked countries in education are all committed to educating their children as their highest priority.

Finland and South Korea, ranked 1st and 2nd in the world, are culturally, socially, and politically unalike. Yet in both, parents have grand expectations for their children; education is well funded; and more importantly, teachers are held in high regard – trusted to do their job.

In Finland, teachers would not tolerate being evaluated by the standardized test scores used in the U.S. to measure student and teacher success. “While Finland and South Korea differ greatly in methods of teaching and learning, they hold the top spots because of a shared social belief in the importance of education and its ‘underlying moral purpose’.”

Dr. Sahlberg, of the Finnish Ministry of Education, made no effort to hide what he felt were clear distinctions between the current Finnish and American approaches to education – he remarked, for example, on the disturbing “deprofessionalization” of teaching.

If we are honest about our priorities in the U.S., we must admit that our emphasis is on Military and National Security, not on education.

finland-map

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EDUCATION’S TOP 20:

1. Finland
2. South Korea
3. Hong Kong
4. Japan
5. Singapore
6. UK
7. Netherlands
8. New Zealand
9. Switzerland
10. Canada
11. Ireland
12. Denmark
13. Australia
14. Poland
15. Germany
16. Belgium
17. USA
18. Hungary
19. Slovakia
20. Russia

By | March 1st, 2014|Education, Teacher|2 Comments

Music Can Help Bring The Grades Up

Does music matter in schools?

Many students can’t even take a music class in school anymore, but for the ones that can and do, it matters a great deal.

Recently we had the chance to interview Spencer Caldwell, this year’s Teacher of the Year for Cajon Valley Union School District, a band and choral teacher at Hillsdale Middle School for the last 17 years.  Caldwell was also Teacher of the Year in 1996 and 2005.  Clearly he is doing something right!

One of the many ways Caldwell has made a difference for students is by founding a nonprofit parent organization called Hillsdale Music Department Parent Association, to help raise money to support his music program, as well as the district’s five feeder elementary schools’ programs.  They raise about $30,000 annually, which makes it possible for students to have music education and performance experiences that extend beyond the basic classroom curriculum, providing instruments and concert attire at no cost to students experiencing financial hardship, providing funding for an assistant band director, piano accompaniment and individual instrumental coaches, supplemental choral instruction, and more.  Some of the parents involved have kids who graduated from the program 5-6 years ago, but they have stayed on the board because of their dedication to the cause.

Spencer Caldwell Spencer Caldwell

When it comes to implementing the new Common Core standards this year, Caldwell feels like he doesn’t have to change much, because he already uses many of the strategies they espouse, and his students are all very engaged.  Also, when they tracked SAT scores, they found that kids who took music classes were ahead of the rest by an average of 60+ points. However, he […]

By | February 28th, 2014|Education, From the Staff, Teacher|0 Comments

Stop Bullying Flash Mob

We all need to be more aware of bullying and the effects it has not only on children, but on adults as well.

Just last week a freshman at Serra High School in Tierrasanta was arrested after it was discovered that he brought an unloaded semi-automatic hand gun to school to confront a bully.  The young man was expelled and arrested with felony charges, in his efforts to protect himself.  No one was physically hurt (in this instance), but clearly damage was done to all involved.

In an effort to raise awareness about bullying and encourage the community to get more involved, Daril Bonner will be presenting an epic Flash Mob at Horton Plaza Mall Square on Saturday, February 22nd, 2014 at 12:30 pm.  This performance will be a heart-wrenching dance drama designed to inspire people to be more than just silent bystanders, but to get involved.

As reported by the “East County Magazine,” San Diego actually has a higher suicide rate than the nation at large.  According to the Centers for Disease Control, suicide ranks tenth in causes of death nationwide.  Daril says, “If we remove the social stigma that comes from seeking help, we reduce the risks.  Stomp out bullying flash mob is designed to counterattack the social stigma that bullying is not that big a deal. The facts and statistics prove otherwise.  It’s vital that the community of San Diego get involved. We are exerting our efforts to help prevent teen suicide and reduce school violence related to bullying in San Diego.”

This flash mob will be a moving, eye opening experience.  If you can make it, please do, and share this […]

By | February 7th, 2014|Bullying, Empathy, From the Staff, Safety|0 Comments

“A Taste of Transformation!” Workshop Launched!

The first day of our six week mini-series is in the books and wow what a great group we have. The focus on this first meeting was empathic listening.

Active, or empathic, listening comes from the theories of Carl Rogers’ person-centered-therapy. This type of listening involves a person listening to another person, and then responding to that person using techniques such as paraphrasing. In this way, the listener restates what has been said, which demonstrates empathy, and shows that he/she was listening and understanding what was being said. This is very useful when a person feels they have something meaningful to say, because they will feel much better about, and be more likely to share it with you if they feel you are actively listening.

Overall the first day of this series went great, as the participants shared many useful things they had gotten from it. We look forward to the next 5 weeks as we explore even more ways the Person Centered Approach can be used in schools.

By | February 3rd, 2014|Empathy, PCA, Workshop|0 Comments

School Violence and What Constitutes a Safe School?

Students report that clear plastic backpacks, metal detectors and armed guards in school do not make them feel safer.  They feel like prisoners in their own school.  So what does it mean to feel safe in school?  It is easier to say what makes school feel unsafe:   physical abuse and violence, verbal taunting, ridicule, threats, spreading rumors, and humiliation, all of which can now take place more publicly and to a much wider degree, thanks to modern technology.  Cell phones, texting, YouTube and Facebook now allow us to torment each other instantly worldwide.   Most students have been both perpetrator and victim to some degree of these behaviors in the course of their school careers.  So we all are capable of making someone else miserable and know what it feels like to have it done to us.  When students don’t feel safe in the school environment, classroom, lunch room, playground, corridors, restrooms, stairwells, after school waiting for the bus or on the public transportation home, they can’t fully engage in learning.  They are either preoccupied with an earlier incident or thinking about how to avoid a future perceived torment.

Most adults believe that the older the students are the less they need (or want) adult help.  It isn’t true. Even adults have difficulty dealing with bullying and intimidating behavior. Just look at our U.S. Congress.  The older we get the more serious the intimidation can become.  Dealing with bullying in school at every grade level requires adult (particularly parents and teachers) involvement.

How can elementary school children deal with the playground bully?  What happens when children fight back?  Or tell an adult what’s going on?  What happens when they don’t?

My wisdom about the answers to these questions comes […]

By | January 8th, 2014|Bullying, Education, Safety|0 Comments