Adminstrators

Can we talk??

From Our Executive Director, Jacqueline Hicks (March 2017 Newsletter):

One of the things teachers identify as a reason for leaving their profession is that they don’t feel supported by their administrator/principal. I choose to interpret this as a need for relationship – a better relationship between the Leader and his/her Followers. (Check out our ‘10 Things Principals Don’t Tell Their Teachers But Should’ blog post. )

I am remembering my experiences as both teacher (follower) and administrator (leader), and I can share how I felt in both roles. As a teacher, I wanted my boss to support me in fulfilling the agreements of my teaching contract and allow me to participate and contribute my gifts. I wanted confirmation about the things I was doing well, and help with the things that were challenging. As the administrator, I wanted my teachers to enthusiastically embrace my vision and help me realize my goals for our students. I wanted partners who would let me know when they thought I was veering off track, and who would add their efforts and ideas to our joint success. I wanted relationships with colleagues who would be responsible and hold me accountable. In my conversations with other teachers and other administrators, they have expressed desires for a similar kind of rapport.

Unfortunately, I found the opportunities to discuss, reflect and improve upon our joint efforts were few and far between. Both as teacher and administrator, the lack of opportunities was disheartening. It wasn’t just lack of time, but also lack of courage and, more importantly, lack of skill. It felt risky to attempt to have conversations about my and other people’s performances. It seemed to me that not only did my colleagues find speaking […]

By | March 22nd, 2017|Adminstrators, Congruence, Empathy, PCA, Teacher|0 Comments

10 Things Principals Don’t Tell Their Teachers, But Should…

From our newsletter of April, 2016: Jackie offers this for a little perspective.  🙂

1. “I really do care how you feel about me.”
I want you to like me, and I know you don’t like everything I do.  When I come off like a hard-ass who doesn’t care about your opinions, it’s mostly because I’m insecure or uncertain of my authority.  I’m your boss; the school is at least partly an extension of myself.  So I want you to like your job.  And I definitely want you to like me.

2. “I don’t think I know everything.”
A few people stepped in, without being asked, and made a huge difference in my professional life.  I will always be grateful to them as mentors and coaches.  So I don’t offer advice to you because I think I’m all knowing or all-powerful.  I see something special in you, and I’m repaying the debt I owe to the people who helped me.

3. “I like when you’re having fun.”
You don’t have to lower your voice and pretend to be serious when I enter your classroom.  I know it’s possible for students to perform at a high level and have a little fun at the same time.  Busy, engaged students aren’t necessarily quiet and serious.  I used to work that way, too.  When you enjoy what you do it makes me feel a little better about our school and about myself.  I get to feel like I’m part of something more than just the administration.

4. “I really would like to pay you more.”
I have a budget based on the number of students in attendance each day.  The largest expenditure is teacher salaries, benefits, and payroll taxes. I am challenged all the time to […]

By | March 15th, 2017|Adminstrators, Education, Empathy, From the Staff, Teacher|0 Comments