Monthly Archives: March 2014

Hands On Turns the Fun On!

Can learning be fun for students and teachers?

Teacher of the Year, Heather Glanz, who has been teaching fourth grade in the Santee School District for the last 17 years, says a very enthusiastic yes to this!  She shared that thinking like a kid is how she does it.

How do you think like a kid?  Glanz says, “Start by putting your hands on everything!!”

The more hands on you can be, the more fun they, and you, will have.  What would a kid really enjoy?  That’s what Glanz asks herself when she is teaching, and for her that works.

We asked Glanz about implementing the new Common Core standards.  She says that most of what she’s already doing with her students, including developing critical thinking skills, is in alignment with the Common Core standards, so it will not be a big transition for her.  She continues to implement the “best practices” that she has perfected over the past 17 years. 

Glanz’s attitude towards students and learning helps her classroom stay fun and exciting.  Many of her students have come back years later to visit her.  They remind her how important her teaching is, and that she really makes a difference.  One such student claimed that Glanz’s passion about science developed in him a lifelong love of science, and inspired him to major in science in college.  How awesome is that?!!

To our question about one thing she would like to see change in education, Glanz answered, “More money and resources allocated for the classroom and the students.”  For example, science needs to be taught through hands on experiments, which requires materials.  “Students can’t learn how a rock forms just from a book,” says Glanz.  In her school, she shares only five […]

By | March 21st, 2014|Education, From the Staff, Teacher|1 Comment

Why is the US ranked 17th in the World, educationally?

How did the United States get so sideways with its educational system?

I’m not sure exactly what caused the U.S. to lose ground educationally, but there are a number of common denominators among the top ranking countries that relate to their success. Although they have very different cultures and governments, the top ten BEST ranked countries in education are all committed to educating their children as their highest priority.

Finland and South Korea, ranked 1st and 2nd in the world, are culturally, socially, and politically unalike. Yet in both, parents have grand expectations for their children; education is well funded; and more importantly, teachers are held in high regard – trusted to do their job.

In Finland, teachers would not tolerate being evaluated by the standardized test scores used in the U.S. to measure student and teacher success. “While Finland and South Korea differ greatly in methods of teaching and learning, they hold the top spots because of a shared social belief in the importance of education and its ‘underlying moral purpose’.”

Dr. Sahlberg, of the Finnish Ministry of Education, made no effort to hide what he felt were clear distinctions between the current Finnish and American approaches to education – he remarked, for example, on the disturbing “deprofessionalization” of teaching.

If we are honest about our priorities in the U.S., we must admit that our emphasis is on Military and National Security, not on education.

finland-map

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EDUCATION’S TOP 20:

1. Finland
2. South Korea
3. Hong Kong
4. Japan
5. Singapore
6. UK
7. Netherlands
8. New Zealand
9. Switzerland
10. Canada
11. Ireland
12. Denmark
13. Australia
14. Poland
15. Germany
16. Belgium
17. USA
18. Hungary
19. Slovakia
20. Russia

By | March 1st, 2014|Education, Teacher|2 Comments